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Books. What are you reading?
Topic Started: Mar 21 2014, 03:30 PM (8,436 Views)
Crusader
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Soren Sonata
Hey gang, what are you favorite books?

I'm a big fan of the classics. The Aeneid, The Iliad, The Odyessy. I love Latin and Greek poets like Catullus, Horace, Aeschylus, and Propertius. I also love historians like Tacitus and Livy.

On the more contemporary side, I love reading non-fiction and history. I recently read a book about the life of Belisarius.

For fiction, I'm enjoying the work of Hilary Mantel. She's working on a trilogy of historical fiction books about the life of Thomas Cromwell in the time of Henry VIII. I also just reread Andre Malraux's work "Man's Fate."
Virgil, Aeneid II, 49: "Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes!"
"Beware of Greeks bearing gifts!"
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Sagie
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crotchety

Corey I always think that if we had met in real life first we would have always been great friends. You are a heart after my own in this respect. I'm a classicist too, though probably closer to the Greeks than the Romans. Speaking of, your signature doesn't happen to be a smarmy reply to mine, does it?

Along with the ancients, I love early American writers. Dickinson, Twain, Whitman, Emerson, Bradstreet, Melville, Frost, Hawthorne, and so on. I love the hope and promise they tend to write with.

At the moment, I'm reading a big ol book of Dickinson poetry, but also some totally unrelated things. I just finished The Little Prince in about thirty minutes last night, and I'm reading "Reading Lolita in Tehran" as a longer work. I've also got a nonfiction, "Magic in the Ancient World" sitting on my coffee table that I pick up from time to time. :D

And, if it counts, my teacher and I are reading together The Clouds by Aristophanes in the original language.
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Crusader
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Soren Sonata
Quote:
 
I'm a classicist too, though probably closer to the Greeks than the Romans.


I minored in Attic Greek. We read the Odyssey from cover to cover for 2 years in Attic. I haven't used it in a few years, I basically just took it to reinforce my Latin since there are a lot of Greek loan words in the language.

Quote:
 
Speaking of, your signature doesn't happen to be a smarmy reply to mine, does it?


^_^

Quote:
 
Along with the ancients, I love early American writers. Dickinson, Twain, Whitman, Emerson, Bradstreet, Melville, Frost, Hardy, and so on. I love the hope and promise they tend to write with.


I've just started to explore American writers. I recently read The Sound and the Fury and I consider it one of the best books I've ever read. People keep telling me to read Moby Dick, though the more they tell me I need to read it the less I feel compelled to do so.
Virgil, Aeneid II, 49: "Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes!"
"Beware of Greeks bearing gifts!"
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Sagie
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crotchety

You sneaky sneak. XD Of the Odyssey, I've only read Nausikka, which happens to be where I learned that saying, though I'm not sure if it's actually the source of it or if it was in Greek speech before that. It's not a great saying, but I liked the context it was in. Nausikka and Kirke have always been my favorites.

Greek made my Latin way better. Not so much the loan words, more that Greek had prepared me for the structures of the noun and verb endings. If you put the declension tables side by side and sound things out it's basically the same for everything that matters. Latin was stupid easy (at least at the beginning) because between Greek structure and the little Spanish I knew, it was easy to make the connections. Of course, I only took a year of it. Everything gets harder when you try to read what folks are actually saying.

Further more, I read regular Latin and sing church Latin and it ruins my pronunciation. Weenee weedee weekee. :D

Moby Dick is my favorite book, actually. Sound and the Fury is wonderful too. Moby Dick though is a book you have to fight through. You either love it or hate it.

If you do plan to read it someday, I'd recommend first reading House of Leaves by Mark Danielewski. Although I'm sure you're no stranger to miring through boring parts to get to the good stuff, Moby Dick must be read as a whole, and not in fragments, and HoL prepared me for it. I think you'd also like HoL just because it's a good book and sections of it will certainly be right up your alley.

But anyway yes, you should read MD one of these days, though I'm sure that just dissuaded you more.
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Crusader
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Soren Sonata
Quote:
 
Greek made my Latin way better. Not so much the loan words, more that Greek had prepared me for the structures of the noun and verb endings.


Latin grammar is insanely easy compared to Greek. Greek has more declensions, more irregularities, more particles, and more constructions. If you took Greek first and then went to Latin you probably found it very easy. Most people take Latin first and then go into Greek (like me) since Latin is more widely offered than Greek.

Latin is really simple. It only has ten irregular verbs: sum, possum, nolo, volo, eo, malo, fero, fio, do, and edo.

Also, I don't know if you knew this but I was in Greece last May for a week. I went to Athens, Piraeus, Mykanos, Delos, Mycenae, and Corinth. It was probably the best trip of my life and I saw so many amazing Greek and Roman ruins. I tried speaking Attic to the locals and they looked at me like I was Shakespere.

Quote:
 
But anyway yes, you should read MD one of these days, though I'm sure that just dissuaded you more.


Okay, okay! I'll give it a try. ^_^
Virgil, Aeneid II, 49: "Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes!"
"Beware of Greeks bearing gifts!"
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Sagie
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crotchety

I got lucky with Greek. A history professor was offering it for the theology masters students and I joined in because I had another class at the time of the Latin class and wasn't interested in Spanish. I loved it so much that after the year of koine, we did an independent study in attic, which we're still doing now even after I've graduated. :) We only meet once a week, but it keeps me fresh and I try to do the exercises in both my Greek and Latin books when I have time.
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Sagie
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crotchety

Also I saw the pics of your trip and was uber-jealous.
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Crusader
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Soren Sonata
I recently reread Tom Sawyer for the first time since 4th grade. It's amazing how much of the satire you miss when you're that young.

Next Twain book on my list: Connecticut Yankee at King Arthur's Court. I read a couple chapters a few years ago and remember it was absolutely hilarious.

Virgil, Aeneid II, 49: "Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes!"
"Beware of Greeks bearing gifts!"
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Sagie
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crotchety

I didn't like that one as much...possibly because I read it in my Arthurian Legends course and it frustrated me. I love Twain but sometimes I just wanna shake him and be like "We get it. You think everyone is dumber than you. Okay...stop."
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Miva
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I've been reading H.G.Wells, I have loads of his short stories, but they're taking me a long time to get through.

I'm on The First Men Inside the Moon at the moment, right at the end, then It'll be The Invisible Man. They are really great reads, it's really interesting to see how much language has changed just in the 100 years.
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Silva
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Fiercer than the Dark

I've been reading Sun Tzu's The Art of War, Laozi's Tao Te Ching and Hagekure (Hidden Leaves) (basically the bushido main poetic work) by Yamamoto Tsunetomo for non-fiction. I tend to read these in my time off on work days. I've been loving learning about the world of Taoism and seeing what truth can be taken from these works about conflict, battle, warfare. I'm enjoying looking in ancient philosophies for teachings that may be useful in the modern world, especially in strategy and gaming worlds (which are often so similar in shape and strategy to the ancient world).

As for fiction, I've been reading Mistborn after finishing Steelheart, both excellent works by Brandon Sanderson, in very different genres. Even though I love Sanderson's work (it's really extraordinary how many books this guy puts out and how wide his range has been), if I'm still reading my way through this series by the time more Song of Ice and Fire comes out, everything Sanderson gets put on hold. No one makes one want to know what happens next quite like George RR Martin does.
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Sagie
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crotchety

Miva, I love Wells. I have a huge collection of his stories...only read two, but I need to read more. :) His writing voice is so British.

What's everyone's favorite book?

I've really got three...Moby Dick by Melville is officially my favorite. But House of Leaves by Mark Danielewski is a close second for all the same reasons, and I read Perelandra by C.S. Lewis whenever I want to be really, really happy inside.
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Harly
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#HarlyforHarly20Harly

For non-fiction, I tend to like either philosophy stuff or history. I have been very slowly (it isn't very exciting, but I enjoy it) reading Plato's Republic, and I recently picked up a few things at this huge book store I visited over break. Among those, I grabbed The Basic Works of Aristotle, which I am excited to start soon, and How the Barbarian Invasions Shaped The Modern World, which my AP World teacher talks about all the time.

In the meantime, I have been rereading The Book Thief, as I managed to get a friend to start reading it, and it is a favorite book of mine besides. Beyond that, we are just starting Of Mice and Men in English. I am not sure how excited I am: On one hand, everyone I know personally who has read it tells me they hated it, and on the other, a lot of them have said the same thing about other assigned readings that were actually rather enjoyable. If it was written anything like The Grapes of Wrath, it will be a lot to trudge through, but generally a good read.
"He walked down, for a long while avoiding looking at her as at the sun, but seeing her, as one does the sun, without looking."
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Sagie
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crotchety

Harly! We are going to be friends I know it. I have two BAs, one in English and the second in philosophy. Plato was a pal and Aristotle was my favorite of the Greeks, though I still think it was awesome that Thales decided everything was water. :D Read the Poetics, they're quite lovely.


The Book Thief I read eons ago and adored it. I haven't read Of Mice and Men. Grapes of Wrath was pretty tedious at times, but Steinbeck on the whole is one of my favorites. Check out East of Eden by him, that's just beautiful.

You're in high school, right? I found that a lot of the things I hated in high school I came to love as I grew up. I hated the Odyssey, first time I read it. Now it's one of my favorite things.
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Harly
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#HarlyforHarly20Harly

Haha, I'm glad that you think so! Nobody minds making a friend.

This whole "everything is water" thing sounds pretty interesting, though I am definitely skeptical. I'll have to check this Thales guy out, haha.

I am in high school, yeah. I'm currently on the tail end of my Sophomore year.
"He walked down, for a long while avoiding looking at her as at the sun, but seeing her, as one does the sun, without looking."
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